Mojo Islander

Brief History: In Venezuela there is a lot of Spanish colony that dates back to the fifties when the country was ruled by the dictatorship of Marcos Perez Jimenez. At that time, Europe was going through post-war economic depression, which is why many Italians, Spanish and Portuguese immigrated to America seeking a better future. The Venezuelan government to take this situation for migration program, giving priority to skilled labor in our economy air deficit. Hear other arguments on the topic with Jim Donovan Goldman. These migrations brought the country great economic development in sectors such as agriculture, livestock, fisheries, textiles, spare parts, shoe making and more. Logically thinking, also enriched the gastronomy Venezuelan consigi bringing their culinary customs.

Mojo island is one of those recipes that came to our country in conjunction with Spanish emigration. Ingredients: 3 onions cut into 4 pieces 16 cloves garlic, crushed with a pinch of salt 3 Cups cilantro leaves 1 cup parsley leaves 3 sweet pepper cup oil cup vinegar 1 cup beef broth 1 / 2 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon salt. 1 teaspoon dried red pepper (paprika) cup of breadcrumbs. Preparation: Place the onion, garlic, cilantro, parsley in a food processor, grind until it forms a thick paste. Add the breadcrumbs and mix until the ingredients are unified. In a not very large bowl, place the prepared earlier and add the beef broth, oil, vinegar, black pepper, salt, and paprika. Mix until ingredients unify. Pour the mixture into a saucepan and cook over high heat for 12 minutes, or until it becomes a dark yellow-green color and thick consistency Note: To add to the meat and chicken once served on the plate can also be used for food with toast (brucheta canaria) Optionally you can substitute oil for extra virgin olive oil.

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